A River view from the railroad. A River view from the railroad.
The Delaware River Watershed provides water to over 17 million people and supports a world-class trout fishery and bald eagles.

Railroad History

The canal was last used on November 5, 1891, and the gravity railroad closed January 3, 1899. On April 28, 1899 the company name was changed to the Delaware and Hudson Company to reflect the lack of a canal.

The Delaware and Hudson Railway (D&H) (AAR reporting marks DH) is a subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway, giving it access to New York City and other parts of the northeastern United States. It was formerly an important bridge line, connecting New York with Montreal, Quebec.

The company started out as the Delaware and Hudson Canal, running from Kingston, New York on the Hudson River southwest to Port Jervis, New York on the Delaware River and beyond to the anthracite coal fields at Carbondale, Pennsylvania. The canal company later built a railroad, one of the first railroads in the United States, later known as the Delaware and Hudson Company and then the Delaware and Hudson Railroad until 1968. The railroad company has called itself "America's oldest continually operated transportation company".

Together with the Pennsylvania Coal Company gravity railroad, the D & H Canal Company expanded, struggled and transformed throughout the 19th century to become part of a 171-mile transportation system from Pittston, PA to Kingston, NY before its demise in 1898. Today, scattered remnants of this once profitable venture remind us of inevitable changes as technology continues to evolve.

Text partially adapted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delaware_and_Hudson_Railway

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